Baby first food ideas 6 months


The Best First Foods for Babies 6 to 9 Months – Happiest Baby

By Happiest Baby Staff

On This Page

  • Best Baby Foods at 6 Months
  • Best Baby Foods at 7 Months
  • Best Baby Foods at 8 Months
  • Best Baby Foods at 9 Months

You've spent the first six months of your baby's life making sure that they are nourished with breastmilk or formula. As they grow and thrive, you might notice that your little sprout shows you some signs that they are ready to graduate from the bottle or breast to solid foods. If your baby can sit up and hold their head up, that's a great first sign! What's more, if they bring objects to their mouth and show an interest in what you are eating, your curious kiddo might be ready to start eating solid foods.

But what should you feed your baby? Here’s a list of perfect starter foods for your baby from ages 6 to 9 months.  

Best Baby Foods at 6 Months

At 6 months, babies may be starting to chew. Though this skill won’t be mastered just yet, they are typically ready to get messy with some mushy, pureed eats—helping them learn about flavor and texture. At this age, the goal is not to satiate your baby with full meals of solid foods but rather to get your child curious and excited about their culinary options. 

Because babies are growing so fast, their needs for iron are high to prevent iron-deficiency and support their overall health. Offer your little one iron rich foods like—infant cereal (read up on why you may want to skip rice cereal), well-cooked meat, poultry, mashed beans, and lentils. To keep your baby safe from choking, avoid adding solids like cereal to baby bottles.

Here are some great first foods for Baby to try:

  • Infant oat, grain, or barley cereals mixed with breastmilk or formula and spoon-fed to your baby
  • Sweet potato puree
  • Squash puree
  • Pea puree
  • Carrot puree
  • Mashed banana
  • Mashed avocado
  • Mashed or pureed beans
  • Mashed or pureed lentils
  • Pureed meats (beef, chicken, or turkey)
  • Soft, falling apart meats (salmon, beef, chicken, turkey)

Check out more of our favorite first food purees. Or, if purees aren’t your thing, read up on how to start baby-led weaning.

Best Baby Foods at 7 Months

By 7 months old, your baby will probably be eating more solids but not enough to replace breastmilk or formula as their primary source of food. The goal for this month is to keep introducing solid foods to your baby. What's fun is by 7 months, you can get more creative with mixing flavors and adding textures.

Here are a few nutritious and delicious food combos to try with your baby:

  • Peas pureed with breastmilk (or formula), sweet potatoes, or squash
  • Kale pureed with blueberry, squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes, peas, pears, or bananas
  • Apples pureed with cauliflower, carrots, pears, prunes, or beets
  • Beef pureed with broccoli
  • Chicken pureed with carrots and potatoes
  • Chickpeas pureed with bananas, apples, or sweet potato
  • Sweet potatoes pureed with red bell pepper

Seven months is also the perfect age to start giving your baby a plate, bowl, and plastic utensils so they can begin to practice feeding themselves. If your baby is teething, you can place frozen chunks of fruit in a sieve feeder/mesh bag that allows them to gnaw on the fruit without choking. Learn more about helping your baby use a fork and spoon!

Best Baby Foods at 8 Months

By 8 months, your baby is likely eating more solids and relying a little less on milk as a primary meal (though it’s still where they get the bulk of their nutrition!). And they’re probably having lots of fun learning how to use their hands to feed themselves. Something else to consider: Babies should be exposed to potential allergen foods (like peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, and fish) before their first birthdays to help prevent future food allergies. Starting at 6 months of age, peanut butter is safe to introduce as long as you are comfortable giving it to your baby.

In fact, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans says that babies can begin having these foods when they start eating solids. But many families often feel more comfortable waiting to introduce these foods until around this age. Of course, consult with your little one’s pediatrician if you have concerns about potential allergen foods. 

Here are some foods to add to your repertoire:

  • Whole eggs, scrambled
  • Nut butter thinned out with water and mixed with cereal (nut butters are sticky and can cause choking)
  • Fully cooked fish, like salmon or tuna 
  • Full-fat yogurt

Here are some preparation ideas:

  • Well-cooked (think over-cooked until falling apart) pasta such as elbows or alphabet shapes 
  • Mashed meat with mashed or ground vegetables such as peas and potatoes or kale and squash
  • Rainbow on a plate: Using tiny pieces of soft, strained, pureed, and mashed food options, look for a variety of colors to offer. Some fun options could include banana, avocado, sweet potato, peas, blueberry, raspberry, cheese, and chicken. 

Best Baby Foods at 9 Months

Though there’s a greater variety of foods babies eat now, formula or breastmilk continues to be their primary source of nutrition until age 1. At 9 months old, babies get more comfortable with self-feeding and eating the foods their families enjoy. After all, eating solid foods is a sensory wonderland of texture, smells, and tastes. Not to mention all that fun making messes with those adorably curious fingers. 

As you begin to focus on meal planning for your baby, there are few things to keep in mind:

  • Babies need four to five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. A serving size for a 9-month-old is less than a quarter cup.
  • "Eat the rainbow" is excellent advice because it gives your baby exposure to lots of different fruits, vegetables, grains, and starches. 

Here are a few menu ideas to help meal plan for your baby…

Breakfast Ideas for Babies

These morning meals pack a nutritional punch—and don’t forget to check out all of our favorite breakfast ideas for babies:

  • Soft fresh fruit cut up in small pieces (think: banana, raspberries, or blueberries)
  • Whole-grain waffles or pancakes
  • Unsweetened oatmeal made with breastmilk or formula combined with cut-up and cooked apples and pears or banana slices. (It is essential to steam the apples or pears to make them soft enough for your baby to mash with their gums.) 
  • Full-fat yogurt mixed with mashed or pureed berries such as blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, or raspberries 
  • Soft scrambled eggs
  • Veggie frittata

Lunch Ideas for Babies

  • Spread hummus on soft crackers or bread
  • Grilled cheese sandwich with cooled tomato soup
  • Macaroni and cheese with cooked veggies like peas and carrots mixed in
  • Pizza bites with chopped bits of spinach in the sauce and melted shredded cheese
  • Quesadilla made with pureed spinach, squash, or beans

Snack Ideas for Babies

Babies this young won’t likely need to snack too much (remember, breastmilk or formula will provide the majority of your little one’s nutrition). Still, it’s not a bad idea to have snacks on hand for when your mini muncher needs something to eat that’s not quite a meal. A few baby snack ideas:

  • Apple and carrot slaw
  • Cheese slices
  • Full-fat plain yogurt
  • Hard-boiled egg
  • Avocado slices
  • Muffins made with fruits, veggies, and/or whole grains
  • Fruit and veggie pouches
  • Sugar-free, whole-grain cereal, like plain Cheerios

Dinner Ideas for Babies

To help your baby get and stay excited about eating solid foods, serve a version of whatever the family is having for dinner. Remember to steam or mash, grind or chop foods into appropriate softness and sizes to prevent choking. Some baby dinner ideas:

  • Pasta with softened vegetables
  • Well-cooked rice, soft veggies, and chicken
  • Baked sweet potato with butter or cheese
  • Beans or lentils served with rice and veggies
  • Flaky fish served with steamed zucchini

There are endless variations on what you can serve your baby for dinner. As long as your baby is safe and happy, try to encourage lots of food exploration! 

You must not feed any child under the age of 1 year honey, cow’s milk, juice, hard foods like candy, raw vegetables, popcorn, or sticky foods like peanut butter, as these each present choking hazards. 

Learn more about feeding your baby:

  • The Happiest Baby Feeding Guide
  • The Benefits of Homemade Baby Food
  • The Best Store-Bought Baby Food

***

REFERENCES

  • Unlocking Opportunities in Food Design for Infants, Children, and the Elderly: Understanding Milestones in Chewing and Swallowing Across the Lifespan for New Innovations. Journal of Texture Studies, August 2017
  • Complementary Feeding: A Position Paper by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition, Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, January 2017
  • Infant Formula Feeding Practices Associated With Rapid Weight Gain: A Systematic Review, Maternal & Child Nutrition, July 2018
  • Solid Food Introduction and the Development of Food Allergies, Nutrients, November 2018 
  • US Department of Agriculture: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025

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Disclaimer: The information on our site is NOT medical advice for any specific person or condition. It is only meant as general information. If you have any medical questions and concerns about your child or yourself, please contact your health provider.

15 Stage One Baby Food Purees (4-6 Months)

Home » Feeding Style » Baby Food Purees » Stage One » 15 Stage One Baby Food Purees

These 15 Stage One Baby Food Recipes will tempt your baby’s taste buds! These simple, homemade baby food recipes are made with nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables with an added pinch of spice that makes these purees out-of-this-world delicious! They’re great for babies 4-6+ months of age!

Medically reviewed and co-written by Jamie Johnson, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN), and Lauren Braaten, Pediatric Occupational Therapist (OT).

Stage One Baby Food Purees

Are you looking to make your baby homemade purees, but don’t know where to start? Does the process intimidate you?

Then you have come to the right place! Here you will find 15 of my all-time favorite starter baby food purees that have been viewed (and made) millions of times by my readers and combined have over 400 5-star reviews!

I would also like to personally welcome you to the wonderful world of baby food, this is a fun (and yummy) club to be in.

Does your baby’s first bite need to be boring?

Of course not!

Baby’s food can (and should be) delicious from the very start!

While it may seem daunting at first, making your own baby food is super easy once you get the hang of it.

And I’m here to walk you through it every step of the way.

First time making homemade baby food? Then I suggest you start this journey by reading my in-depth Guide on How to Make Homemade Baby Food. The detailed guide goes over all the important information such as the best cooking tools to have on hand, safe storage, how to know when baby is ready for solids, how to introduce purees, the best first foods for baby, and so much more! You can also check out my best-selling cookbook for even more information and recipes!

15 Stage One Baby Puree Video

While the recipes themselves are simple, in this video I will show you how to add in a pinch of cinnamon, rosemary, curry, or mint to quickly roasted or steamed fruits and vegetables that enhance their natural flavors. In other words, these are simple purees that I am pretty sure you will want to eat as well!

What is In Each Puree Recipe

After going through this guide, you will want to check out some (or all!) of the homemade baby food recipes below. Each recipe goes into detail about the:

  • produce that is in the puree
  • benefits of that produce for your baby
  • recipe cooking options
  • detailed photos and videos with step-by-step instructions

Reminder: The homemade baby food recipes below are made for babies that want to try the most delicious food from the very first bite! 😋

Helpful Tools

Let’s start with a few of my favorite kitchen essentials to make the best homemade baby food purees! These kitchen tools will help make the process of cooking, blending, and freezing baby food hassle-free. You can find a full list of my favorite baby and toddler food making tools in my online Shop.

Kitchen Tools
  • Blender or Food Processor
  • Freezer Storage Tray
  • Fridge Storage Containers
  • Stasher Bag
  • Baking Sheet
  • Steamer Basket
  • Medium Saucepan
  • Reusable Pouches

Feeding Essentials
  • High Chair
  • Suction Bowl and Spoon Set
  • Bib with Food Catcher

Learning Resources: looking for the best high chair, cups or spoons for your baby? Then we’ve got you covered! Here you will find How to Find the Best High Chair for Baby, an easy guide on Best First Open Cups for Baby (plus 4 tips when introducing a cup) as well as 3 Tips on How To Spoon Feed Baby (plus – our favorite spoons for purees or BLW).

Frequently Asked Questions

Can babies have spices in their food?

Yes, yes, yes! Babies can absolutely have spices mixed into their purees from the very first bite. Adding a pinch of spice or herbs to a baby’s food makes it taste better and gives the food additional medicinal properties. Read more here. But as I always say — you do you! If you don’t want to add spices to your baby’s food, you can certainly leave them out. Don’t worry, I give instructions on each recipe card for both.

What about allergies? Can spices cause an allergic reaction?

My rule of thumb is that unless there is an immediate family member that has a true allergy to a certain spice or food, then introducing your baby to spices at the same time as new food is completely acceptable. Spice and herb allergies in babies and adults are very rare. But remember, it’s always recommended to keep an eye on your baby when introducing any new food or spices.

At what age should I start my baby on baby food purees?

When a baby can start on solid foods is determined by their own rate of development, which generally comes between 4-6 months of age. Some of the developmental milestones babies need to reach to start solids include: if your baby has solid control of their head and neck, if your baby has doubled in weight, and if your baby is reaching for or opening their mouth when you eat (see my guide here). Before you start your baby on purees, you should consult with your pediatrician to make sure your child is developmentally ready for solids.

How to Make Baby Food Purees

All of our baby food recipes are designed to enhance the natural taste of the fruits and veggies while keeping as many nutrients intact as possible. In other words, the goal is to make a puree that’s both healthy and delectable.

There are several ways you can cook baby food purees, but the main techniques I use are:

  •  Steaming
  •  Roasting
  •  Simmering
  •  Raw

Keep in mind, that as long as the produce is cooked until soft, that there isn’t a right or wrong way to cook it for baby food.

If a recipe for broccoli calls for steaming but you want to roast it because you will already be roasting some broccoli for yourself for dinner, then go ahead and roast the broccoli for your baby’s puree. Play around and have some fun with it!

Adding Spices to Baby Purees

It’s encouraged that you can serve your baby a homemade puree with a pinch of spices or herbs from the very first bite.

Benefits of Spices

  • boost and compliment any fruit or vegetable puree
  • broaden baby’s emerging palate
  • add more flavor and depth into their foods
  • decrease picky eating in the years to come
  • have medicinal properties in them — they can help with digestive issues, boost brain functions, repair muscle tissues, and so on.

While each puree recipe on this site has a selection of spices or herbs that complement the flavors of the fruit or vegetable in the puree, it’s up to you if you want to add them. You do you! Either way, the puree recipes on this site will be delicious.

Top Spices to Add to Baby’s Puree

  • Cinnamon
  • Cloves
  • Nutmeg
  • Basil
  • Mint
  • Parsley
  • Mild Curry Powder
  • Fresh Lemon Juice
  • Garlic
  • Rosemary

How to Store Baby Purees

Every recipe below has specific instructions on how to store that particular puree, but these are the general guidelines.

How to Freeze Baby Food

Your freezer is about to become your new best friend, allowing you to keep several weeks’ worth of baby purees at the ready. Whenever you make a puree, put several ounces in the fridge for your little one to enjoy that week, then freeze the rest of the batch for your baby to eat at a later date. Please make sure you get it in the puree into the fridge or freezer within 1 hour of cooking to prevent bacteria growth.

  1. Make a puree.
  2. Let it cool slightly.
  3. Transfer the puree to freezer trays or freezer jars.
  4. Cover the freezer trays with a lid or plastic wrap.
  5. Label with date and name of puree.
  6. Place the tray in the freezer.
  7. Let it freeze for at least 5 hours.
  8. Take the tray out of the freezer.
  9. Crack the purees out of the trays.
  10. Place the frozen purees into zip-lock baggies or stasher bags.

How to Store Baby Food

Purees can be stored for up to four days in an airtight container in the fridge or 4 months in the freezer.

How to Thaw Baby Food

Thawing may seem like a no-brainer, but it never hurts to know your options. There are three different ways to thaw purees.

Microwave
  1. Take the frozen puree cubes that you want to serve out of your freezer.
  2. Place them in a glass microwave-safe container.
  3. Microwave in 20-second increments, stirring every time.
  4. The puree is ready when it is just warm to your touch.
  5. Grab two clean spoons, one for you and one for your baby, and test your puree before serving.

Heating Tip: To prevent the microwave from unevenly heating the puree, which can leave it with cold and really hot spots and can burn your baby’s mouth, make sure you stir between each interval and taste test it before serving to your baby. 

Refrigerator

This one takes the longest time, but it is an excellent alternative to using a microwave.

  1. Take the frozen puree cubes you want to serve out of your freezer.
  2. Place the cubes in an air-tight glass container.
  3. Place the container in the fridge and let the cubes thaw for 8 to 12 hours, usually overnight.
  4. Do not leave the puree in the container to thaw on the counter or anywhere out of the fridge, as bacteria will start to grow at a rapid rate — which is definitely not recommended.
  5. Note that the puree will be cold but thawed. So if your baby likes their puree warmed, you’ll have to finish the job using the microwave or stovetop method.
Stovetop
  1. In a small saucepan, add the frozen puree cubes you want to serve to your baby.
  2. Over medium-low heat, gently cook the puree until warm, stirring occasionally.

Thawing Tip: Some infants like their puree cold, warm, or really warm, and some will eat it no matter the temperature. You will get to know your baby’s personal preferences as the two of you bond over food.

Feeding Tips

  • Make sure baby is showing readiness signs for eating – good control of their head and trunk, sitting with minimal assistance, bringing hands or toys to their mouth, and appearing interested in your food when you’re eating.
  • Follow your baby’s lead – when feeding purees from a spoon, sometimes there’s a tendency to keep offering bites past the point of your baby being full. Always follow your baby’s cues for when they are done eating. Turning away from the spoon, closing her mouth, or pushing food away are all signs that your baby is finished with the meal.
  • Throwing spoons – is a common phase that all babies go through at one point or another. One of the best ways to handle spoon throwing is to ignore it and keep feeding your baby as usual (with an extra spoon you already have at the table). If your baby ends up also throwing back up spoons #2 AND #3, simply encourage your baby to eat with their hands until they appear to be finished with the meal.

Top Rated Baby Food Purees

Pea Baby Puree (Stage One)

4.90 stars (78 ratings)

A delicious way to introduce peas to baby. Mild peas paired with a fresh hint of mint – a mouth-watering combo!

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Apples Baby Food Puree

4.75 stars (54 ratings)

This Apple Baby Puree recipe is a wonderful first food for baby! A delicious nutrient-dense puree that baby will go gaga over!

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The Best Sweet Potato Baby Food

5 stars (50 ratings)

This Homemade Sweet Potato with Curry Baby Food Puree is a fun and exotic first puree for baby! Great for 4+ months and is completely freezer-friendly!

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Broccoli Baby Food

4. 79 stars (64 ratings)

This Broccoli Baby Food with olive oil recipe is a great way to introduce healthy green vegetables into your baby's diet. A delicious puree full of essential vitamins and healthy fats for growing baby

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Oatmeal for Babies (Stage One)

5 stars (39 ratings)

This Oatmeal Recipe for Baby is made with simple nutrient-dense ingredients in less than 10 minutes, and it's perfect for baby's first bite or added into their favorite fruit or veggie puree. Great for 4+ months and up. 

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Avocado for Baby – Puree & BLW

5 stars (14 ratings)

Avocados are a superfood and great first food for babies 6 months and up. Serve them pureed, smashed, or as a finger food for baby-led weaning.

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WeeSprout Baby Food Freezer Tray

My all-time favorite freezer tray! Individual servings pop out easily. The hard plastic lid snaps on with ease and allows for convenient stacking of freezer trays. Dishwasher safe!

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Butternut Squash Baby Food

5 stars (30 ratings)

This homemade Roasted Butternut Squash Baby Food Puree not only contains calcium, folate, vitamins A and C and fiber but it is also a deliciously smooth way to introduce butternut squash to your baby!

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Green Bean Baby Food

5 stars (33 ratings)

Green beans are steamed until just tender, this puree has a mild taste for baby's palette.

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Creamy Mango-licious Baby Food Puree

4.85 stars (26 ratings)

This 5-minute Mango Baby Food Puree is a great way to introduce baby to the magical taste of one of the world's healthiest fruits – MANGOS!

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Pear Baby Puree (Stage One)

5 stars (19 ratings)

This smooth and creamy homemade Pear Baby Puree is a wonderful first puree for baby – easy on the taste buds and great for their growing bodies!

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Peach Baby Puree (Stage One)

5 stars (13 ratings)

Smooth and creamy, this homemade Peach Baby Puree delivers big on taste with naturally sweetened peaches and flecks of vanilla bean.

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Basic Chicken Baby Food

4.40 stars (192 ratings)

This homemade Basic Chicken Baby Food is a great puree to add to any of your baby’s favorite fruit or veggie purees. Great for extra protein and flavor!

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Homemade Baby Rice Cereal

4.88 stars (48 ratings)

Using only 1-ingredient, this Homemade Baby Rice Cereal is a simple and easy recipe to make baby!

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Red Pepper Baby Puree

4.88 stars (33 ratings)

This Red Pepper Baby Puree recipe is a smooth, creamy and naturally sweet puree that is loaded with vitamin A, B6 and C. Great for 4+ months and older (or stage 1 puree).

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More Baby Fooe Purees

  • Strawberry Baby Puree
  • Blueberry Baby Puree
  • Pumpkin Baby Puree
  • Rasberry Baby Food
  • Banana Puree
  • Homemade Quinoa Baby Cereal
Pea Baby Food Puree
  • 2 cups peas, fresh or frozen
  • 1 medium zucchini, roughly chopped (optional)
  • 4 mint leaves, roughly chopped (optional)
Sweet Potato Baby Food Puree
  • 2 large sweet potatoes
  • 1/4 tsp mild curry powder (optional)
  • 1/4-1 cup liquid, (water, fresh breast milk, formula or sodium-free chicken stock) for pureeing
Roasted Banana Puree 
  • 4 bananas, cut lengthwise
  • 1/8 tsp fresh rosemary, finely chopped (optional)
Carrot Baby Food Puree
  • 2 pounds carrots, trimmed, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg (optional)
  • 1/2-1 cup liquid, (water, reserved water, fresh breast milk, formula or low-sodium stock) for pureeing
Apples Baby Food Puree
  • 6 apples, peeled, cored and chopped
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon (optional)
Broccoli Baby Food Puree
  • 2 cups broccoli, chopped into small florets
  • 1 small white potato, apple or pear, peeled and roughly chopped, roughly 1/2 cup (optional)
  • 1 tbsp good quality olive oil (optional)
Butternut Squash Baby Puree
  • 1 butternut squash
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme, roughly chopped (optional)
  • 1-2  tsp olive oil (optional)
  • 1/2-1 cup liquid (water, fresh breast milk, formula, low or no-sodium stock or bone broth), for pureeing
Green Bean Baby Food Puree
  • 1 pound green beans, fresh or frozen, trimmed
  • 1 big pinch fresh basil, cilantro or parsley, finely chopped (optional)
Creamy Mango-licious Baby Food Puree
  • 2 cups fresh or frozen mango, deseed, peeled and roughly chopped. If using frozen mangos, thaw first
  • 1 medium banana (optional)
  • 1 pinch nutmeg (optional)
Pear Baby Food Puree
  • 6 pears, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 1/8 tsp cardamom or cinnamon (optional)
  • 1/4 cup water
Peach Baby Puree
  • 3 fresh peaches or 12oz frozen peaches, do not thaw frozen peaches – use frozen
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla bean pod (optional)
  • 1 pinch pinch nutmeg (optional)
Basic Chicken Baby Puree
  • 1 8-ounce boneless skinless chicken breast or thighs, cubed
  • 1 cups chicken or veggie stock, low-sodium or sodium-free
  • 1 tsp dried parsley (optional)
Homemade Baby Rice Cereal
  • 1 cup brown rice, I prefer organic short grain
  • 2 cups water for cooking
  • 1-2 cups of liquid for blending, (water, fresh breastmilk or formula)
Red Pepper Baby Puree
  • 2 red bell peppers, deseeded and roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup white potato, apple or pear, peeled and roughly chopped
Oatmeal for Babies
  • 2 cup water
  • 1 cup old fashioned oats
  • 1/2 tsp chia seeds (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp hemp seeds (optional)
Avocado for Baby
  • 1/4 avocado
  • 1 tsp breast milk, formula or water
Pea Baby Food Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, bring 2″ of water to a boil over medium heat. Place the zucchini in a steamer basket, and place over boiling water. Cover and steam for 5 minutes.

  • Add in the peas, and steam for an additional 3-5 minutes. Reserve steamer water. Let cool slightly.

  • Add the zucchini, peas and mint leaves to a blender or food processor and puree for 1 minute or until you have achieved the desired texture. If the puree is too thick, add in 1/4 cup of the reserved steamer water until you have the right consistency.

    Note on Zucchini: while this is a 2 vegetable starter puree, zucchini allergies are very low, so I added it to this recipe to give the peas a mild taste and smoother texture. You can completely leave them out if you prefer. Just steam the peas as directed.  

Sweet Potato Baby Food Puree
  • Heat oven to 400°. Line baking sheet with tin foil, parchment paper or a silicone mat.

  • Wash and dry the sweet potatoes. Prick with a fork in several places and then place the sweet potatoes on the baking sheet. Bake for 45 minutes – 1 hour or until a fork can easily prick the sweet potato. Let sit until cool to touch.

  • Make a cut into the skin of the potato lengthwise and peel away the skin of the potato. Scoop out the sweet potato meat and place into a blender or food processor, adding in the mild curry powder and water.

  • Puree on high for 1-2 minutes or until smooth, adding in additional liquid in 1/4 cup increments if needed. I had to add in 1 cup of water to the puree pictured. Serve or freeze for a later meal.

    Additional Spices: Feel free to use the following spices instead of the curry – 1/2 tsp of cumin, 1/4 tsp of nutmeg, 1/2 tsp of cloves, 1 fresh garlic clove, 1/2 tsp of chopped fresh thyme, 3-4 basil leaves, 1/2 tsp chopped rosemary or even a big pinch of fresh ginger or 1/2 tsp ginger powder. Or you can leave out the spices altogether.

Roasted Banana Baby Puree 
  • Heat oven to 325 degrees F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.

  • Place bananas on a baking sheet and roast for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool slightly.

  • Place bananas and rosemary into a blender or food processor and puree for 1-2 minutes or until completely smooth. You may need to add additional water, so start by adding in 1/4 cup increments until you get the desired consistency.

    Additional Spices: This recipe is also great with 1 tsp cinnamon, 1/2 tsp cloves, 1/2 tsp nutmeg, or for a fun twist, 1/2 tsp mild curry.

    Note on Bananas: while any ripeness of bananas will work, I have found that the bananas that are ripe to very ripe tend to work best in this recipe.

Carrot Baby Food Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, bring 2″ of water to a boil over medium heat.

  • Place the carrots into a steamer basket, cover and cook for 9-11 minutes or until tender. Reserve steamer water. Let cool slightly.

  • Place the carrots, nutmeg and 1/2 cup of liquid into a blender or food processor and puree for 1-2 minutes on high, adding 1/4 cup liquid at a time until you achieve the desired consistency. Serve and enjoy, or freeze for later.

    Notes on Nutmeg: adding in spices to babies first purees are completely optional, but totally safe. Nutmeg rounds out the acidic taste carrots sometimes have and make this puree taste grounded and full-bodied.  

    Additional Spices: Feel free to substitute 1/2 tsp ginger powder or 1/4 fresh ginger, 1/2 tsp mild curry powder, 1/4 tsp cloves, 1/2 tsp finely minced fresh chives or 1/2 garlic clove instead of the nutmeg. 

Apples Baby Food Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, place the apples, water and cinnamon. Cover and heat on medium-low for 15-20 minutes or until apples are tender. Let cool slightly.

  • Transfer all of the ingredients into a blender or food processor and blend for 1-2 minutes or until completely smooth. For a chunky puree, quickly pulse the ingredients 10-15 times or until you receive your desired consistency. Serve or freeze for later.

    Additional Spices: Feel free to sub in these spices instead of the cinnamon for this recipe – 1/8 tsp of cloves, 1/8 tsp of nutmeg, 1-2 leaves of fresh mint, 1-2 leaves of fresh basil, a pinch of fresh or 1/4 tsp of ginger powder or even 1/4 of coriander for a fun twist.

    Apples: you can use any sweet apple in this recipe – Gala, Honeycrisp, Fuji, McIntosh, etc.

Broccoli Baby Food Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, bring 2 inches of water to a boil over medium heat. Place the broccoli and potato (or apple/pear) into a steamer basket and place over boiling water, cover and steam for 10-12 minutes or until the broccoli and potato are tender. Reserve water from the steamer. Let cool slightly.

  • Add the broccoli, potato and olive oil into a blender or food processor and puree until smooth, adding the reserved water from the steamer basket in 1/4 cup increments if needed.

    Adding In Spices: Feel free to add in 1 tsp of chopped chives, 2-3 mint leaves, 1 tsp of chopped cilantro, 1/2 tsp cumin or a squeeze of fresh lemon juice.

Butternut Squash Baby Puree
  • Heat oven to 450 degrees F. Line baking sheet with a silicone mat, tin foil or parchment paper.

  • Cut butternut squash in half, deseed and place flesh side up, skin side down. Optional – Feel free to drizzle the squash with 1-2 teaspoons of olive oil for some added healthy fat.

    Bake for 45 minutes or until you can easily prick the squash with a fork. Let cool until you can handle the squash with your hands.

  • Scrape off the skin and discard. Place the butternut squash into a blender or food processor. Add thyme and puree for 1-2 minutes, adding water in 1/4 cup increments until you have your desired consistency. I had to add 3/4 cup of water to my puree shown below.

    Additional Spices: Feel free to sub the thyme for 4 basil leaves, 1 tsp chopped rosemary, 1 tsp ginger powder, or 1 big pinch of fresh ginger, 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg, or even 1/2 tsp of coriander.

Green Bean Baby Food Puree
  • Fill a medium saucepan with 2” of water and bring to boil over medium heat. Place the green beans (fresh or frozen) into a steamer basket over the boiling water, cover, and cook for 10 minutes or until tender. Let cool slightly. Reserve steamer water.

  • Transfer the green beans and herb to a blender or food processor and puree for 1-2 minutes or until smooth, adding reserved steamer water in 1/4 cup increments if needed until you reach your desired consistency.

    Adding Spices: you can add a big pinch of roughly chopped basil, cilantro, mint, parsley, or chives to this puree before blending. 

Creamy Mango-licious Baby Food Puree
  • Place the mango, banana and nutmeg (if using) into a blender or food processor. Puree for 1 minute or until completely smooth. If your mango is not ripe enough, you might need to add in up to 1/4 cup of water while blending to get the right consistency. Serve or freeze for later.

  • Mango Tip: I usually find that organic frozen mangos are easier and cheaper to find than fresh organic mangos, but if mangos are in season when you are making this recipe, by all means, you can use fresh over frozen. For fresh mangos, simply peel and chop. 

Pear Baby Food Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, place the pears, cardamon and water, cover and heat on medium-low heat for 10-15 minutes, or until tender. Let cool slightly.

  • Using a slotted spoon, scoop the pears out of the saucepan, leaving water behind, and into a blender or food processor. Blend for 1-2 minutes until you have your desired consistency. If your pear puree is too thick, add the leftover cooking water in 1/4 cup increments.

Peach Baby Puree
  • If using fresh peaches, peel, pit and slice the peaches. If using the fresh vanilla bean pod, cut in half and then slice open lengthwise. Take the back of your knife or spoon and scrape out all of the vanilla bean, reserve.

  • In a medium saucepan, add the peaches and water, cook over medium-low heat for 5 minutes (fresh peaches) – 10 minutes (frozen peaches). Right before the peaches are done cooking, add in the vanilla and nutmeg (or any other spices you prefer) and stir until incorporated—Cook for 1 more minute.

  • Using a slotted spoon, transfer the peaches to a blender or food processor, leaving all excess water in the saucepan. You do not want to add any additional liquids, or the puree might be too thin. Starting on low and increasing to high speed, puree the peaches until smooth and creamy. Serve to baby or freeze for later.

Basic Chicken Baby Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, bring the cubed chicken, broth, and parsley to a boil over medium heat. Turn the heat down to low and simmer, covered, for 15 minutes or until chicken is just cooked through. Let cool slightly.

  • Using a slotted spoon, transfer the chicken to a blender or food processor, leaving the broth in the saucepan. Reserve the broth.

    Starting on low and working your way up to high-speed, puree the chicken until you reach your desired consistency, adding in broth in 1/4 cup increments if needed. I had to add in just 1/4 cup of broth to get the consistency seen in this photo.

    Extra Healthy Fat: For some extra healthy fat, this puree is also wonderful, with a teaspoon of grass-fed butter (salt-free) added to the blender right before pureeing.

Homemade Baby Rice Cereal
  • IMPORTANT STEP: Place the rice in a fine-mesh colander and rinse with water until the water runs clear.

  • Transfer the rice to a medium saucepan and add 2 cups of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to low, cover with a lid and simmer for 35-45 minutes or until the rice is tender and the water is evaporated. Each batch of rice cooks a little differently, so taste at 35 minutes to see if the rice is tender. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let rest for 10 minutes, covered. If using fresh breast milk or formula for blending, I would remove the lid and let the rice cool for 15 minutes.

  • Place the rice into a blender or food processor and add 1/2 cup of liquid of choice. Blend for 1-2 minutes on medium-high speed until completely smooth and creamy, adding in the additional liquid in 1/4 cup increments, if needed, until you have your desired consistency.

Red Pepper Baby Puree
  • In a medium saucepan, bring 2″ of water to a boil.

    If using a potato: place it in a steamer basket and steam for 10 minutes before adding peppers, and cooking for another 5-7 minutes.

    If using pear or apple: add in the red peppers and apple or pear and steam for 5-7 minutes or until tender. Reserve steamer water. Let cool slightly.

  • Add in all of the ingredients into a blender or food processor and puree for 1 minute or until completely smooth, adding in a tablespoon of water at a time if needed.

Oatmeal for Babies
  • In a medium saucepan, bring 2 cups of water to a boil. Add in 1 cup of old-fashioned oats along with the chia seeds, hemp seeds and any spices you are using. Turn down the heat to medium-low and cook the oats for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until all of the water is gone and the oats are soft. Let cool slightly. 

  • Transfer the oats to a blender or food processor and puree for 1-2 minutes, adding water in 1/4 cup increments if needed, until completely smooth.  I had to add 1/2 cup of water to my oatmeal. You will want the oat cereal to be on the thinner side, so it doesn't become sticky. The oats will continue to absorb liquid as they cool, so you can add more water, fresh breast milk, or formula as needed. Serve to baby or freeze for later. 

  • Type of Oats: This recipe is for old-fashioned oats: for steel-cut or instant oats, read the full post. 

    Adding Spices: you can add a big pinch of cinnamon or pumpkin pie spice mix or a smaller pinch of nutmeg or cloves to these oats before blending. 

    Chia and Hemp Seeds: are added for a nutritional boost, but you can add or omit them if you prefer. You can get both of these at any health food store or online here (chia/hemp).

Avocado for Baby

Age: 4-6 months and up

 

Yield: roughly 15-25 ounces, depending on the recipe

 

Freezer Tray

Bumkins Baby Bowl

Blender

Saucepan

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Complementary foods at 6 months | Useful tips from the Tyoma brand

Pediatricians around the world, including experts from the World Health Organization, unanimously believe that the introduction of complementary foods should be carried out in the interval of 4-6 months.

Early introduction of complementary foods (up to 4 months). fraught with the development of allergic reactions and indigestion.

Late introduction of complementary foods, from 7 months, can lead to a deficiency in the child's diet of essential nutrients, an iron deficiency state at the age of 9-10 months, eating disorders, delayed development of chewing skills and swallowing of thick foods.

With the normal development of the child and the absence of signs of iron deficiency anemia, complementary foods can be introduced from 6 months. This applies to both formula-fed and breast-fed babies.

Signs that a baby is ready to breastfeed include

  • Absence of the spoon-ejection reflex
  • the presence of a bright food interest in the baby to the food of adults

It is important to remember that a child’s lack of teeth and the ability to sit are not signs of a baby’s unpreparedness for eating thick food.

It is very important to understand the main goals of the introduction of complementary foods:

  1. Provide the child with the necessary nutrients.
  2. Develop a child's food interest, introduce him to new tastes.

In no case should the introduction of complementary foods be of a violent nature, since this will not only not contribute to the development of a child’s food interest, but can also lead to a complete refusal of the baby from complementary foods, which will destroy the main goals of complementary foods.

How to start introducing complementary foods at 6 months of age?

The first product of complementary foods, regardless of the start date of the introduction of complementary foods and the type of feeding of the baby (breast or artificial), should be energy-intensive foods: porridge, or vegetable puree.

If the child has a liquefied or unstable stool, and there is also a lack of body weight, then it is better to choose porridge as the first complementary food. After 3-4 days from the beginning of the introduction of porridge, butter can be gradually added to it (up to 5 g per serving of porridge in 150 g)

If the child has a tendency to constipation, then it is better to choose vegetable marrow puree as the first complementary food, which can have a mild laxative effect on the child's stool. Starting from the 3-4th day of the introduction of vegetable puree, vegetable oil can be gradually added to it (up to 5 g per serving of vegetables in 150 g)

What products are better to give preference to at 6 months?

Kashi

The first cereals can be buckwheat, rice or corn. They must be dairy-free and can be diluted with water or breast milk, or the mixture that the baby eats. Later, you can introduce oatmeal and millet porridge

Vegetables

The first vegetable puree can be zucchini, broccoli, or cauliflower. Later, kohlrabi, potatoes, green beans, white cabbage, green peas, celery can be introduced into the diet.

Fruit

The third type of complementary foods can be fruit puree from apples, pears or bananas. Later, you can introduce mashed apricot, peach. For starters, fruit puree may not be given to the child separately, but it is better to mix it with cereal or vegetables so that the child does not begin to prefer the sweet taste of fruits. When the amount of fruit puree reaches 50 g or more, it can also be given separately, for example, after the child has eaten porridge or cottage cheese.

Juices

Juices should not be the first feeding, in addition, they can not be introduced into the baby's first year of life at all, given their sweet taste and low nutritional value.

Basic rules for the introduction of complementary foods from 6 months

  1. A faster introduction of the main complementary foods into the child's diet compared to their introduction from 4 or 5 months, namely, bringing the amount of one product to the age volume can be carried out in 5-7 days.
  2. Introduction of complementary foods before breastfeeding or formula.
  3. Feeding the child is carried out not at the request of the child, but at the request of the mother. What it means: you should try to introduce complementary foods regularly and at the same time, allocating for this conditionally time for the future breakfast, lunch and dinner (afternoon snack).

How to start the introduction of a new product?

The introduction of a new product should be gradual.

  • On day 2 - 3 tsp. (15 g)
  • On day 3 - 6 tsp. (30 g)
  • Day 4 - 50 g
  • Day 5 - 100 g
  • On the 7th day - 150 g

Important!

If on the 5-7th day of the introduction of a new product, the baby still cannot eat 100-150 ml of porridge or puree at once, then this amount can be divided into 2 doses, for example, give 100 ml of porridge in the morning and 50 ml in the evening.

From the second week of the introduction of a new product, one milk feeding can be completely replaced with complementary foods.

Approximate weekly feeding schedule

If we start complementary foods with vegetable puree, then the schedule might look something like this:

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Lunch (14:00): broccoli 10-150 grams. Supplementing with breast milk or infant formula
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml

2 weeks

From the second week, you need to start introducing dairy-free porridge.

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): porridge 10-150 g, supplemented with breast milk or infant formula
  • Lunch (14:00): Broccoli 150 grams. Vegetable oil 5 g Supplementary feeding with breast milk or infant formula up to 50 ml
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula

3 week

From the third week, you need to start introducing meat puree, which is most convenient to add to vegetable puree

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): porridge 150 g, supplemented with breast milk or infant formula
  • Lunch (14:00): Broccoli 150 grams. Vegetable oil 5 g Meat puree 5-20 g Supplementation with breast milk or infant formula up to 50 ml
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula

4 week

From the fourth week, you can introduce fruit puree, which is most convenient to add to porridge

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): porridge 150 g, fruit puree up to 50 g
  • Lunch (14:00): Broccoli 150 grams. Vegetable oil 5 g Meat puree 20 g Supplementation with breast milk or infant formula
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula

From the fifth week, you can begin to introduce the second type of porridge, which is most convenient to start adding to the first type, gradually displacing its amount.

From the sixth week, you can enter another type of vegetable puree. And so on.

By 7 months two milk feedings can be completely replaced with complementary foods.

Complementary foods at 6 months | Useful tips from the Tyoma brand

Pediatricians around the world, including experts from the World Health Organization, unanimously believe that the introduction of complementary foods should be carried out in the interval of 4-6 months.

Early introduction of complementary foods (up to 4 months). fraught with the development of allergic reactions and indigestion.

Late introduction of complementary foods, from 7 months, can lead to a deficiency in the child's diet of essential nutrients, iron deficiency at the age of 9-10 months, eating disorders, delayed development of chewing skills and swallowing of solid foods.

With the normal development of the child and the absence of signs of iron deficiency anemia, complementary foods can be introduced from 6 months. This applies to both formula-fed and breast-fed babies.

Signs that a baby is ready to breastfeed include

  • Absence of the spoon-ejection reflex
  • the presence of a bright food interest in the baby to the food of adults

It is important to remember that a child’s lack of teeth and the ability to sit are not signs of a baby’s unpreparedness for eating thick food.

It is very important to understand the main goals of the introduction of complementary foods:

  1. Provide the child with the necessary nutrients.
  2. Develop a child's food interest, introduce him to new tastes.

In no case should the introduction of complementary foods be of a violent nature, since this will not only not contribute to the development of a child’s food interest, but can also lead to a complete refusal of the baby from complementary foods, which will destroy the main goals of complementary foods.

How to start introducing complementary foods at 6 months of age?

The first product of complementary foods, regardless of the start date of the introduction of complementary foods and the type of feeding of the baby (breast or artificial), should be energy-intensive foods: porridge, or vegetable puree.

If the child has a liquefied or unstable stool, and there is also a lack of body weight, then it is better to choose porridge as the first complementary food. After 3-4 days from the beginning of the introduction of porridge, butter can be gradually added to it (up to 5 g per serving of porridge in 150 g)

If the child has a tendency to constipation, then it is better to choose vegetable marrow puree as the first complementary food, which can have a mild laxative effect on the child's stool. Starting from the 3-4th day of the introduction of vegetable puree, vegetable oil can be gradually added to it (up to 5 g per serving of vegetables in 150 g)

What products are better to give preference to at 6 months?

Kashi

The first cereals can be buckwheat, rice or corn. They must be dairy-free and can be diluted with water or breast milk, or the mixture that the baby eats. Later, you can introduce oatmeal and millet porridge

Vegetables

The first vegetable puree can be zucchini, broccoli, or cauliflower. Later, kohlrabi, potatoes, green beans, white cabbage, green peas, celery can be introduced into the diet.

Fruit

The third type of complementary foods can be fruit puree from apples, pears or bananas. Later, you can introduce mashed apricot, peach. For starters, fruit puree may not be given to the child separately, but it is better to mix it with cereal or vegetables so that the child does not begin to prefer the sweet taste of fruits. When the amount of fruit puree reaches 50 g or more, it can also be given separately, for example, after the child has eaten porridge or cottage cheese.

Juices

Juices should not be the first feeding, in addition, they can not be introduced into the baby's first year of life at all, given their sweet taste and low nutritional value.

Basic rules for the introduction of complementary foods from 6 months

  1. A faster introduction of the main complementary foods into the child's diet compared to their introduction from 4 or 5 months, namely, bringing the amount of one product to the age volume can be carried out in 5-7 days.
  2. Introduction of complementary foods before breastfeeding or formula.
  3. Feeding the child is carried out not at the request of the child, but at the request of the mother. What it means: you should try to introduce complementary foods regularly and at the same time, allocating for this conditionally time for the future breakfast, lunch and dinner (afternoon snack).

How to start the introduction of a new product?

The introduction of a new product should be gradual.

  • On day 2 - 3 tsp. (15 g)
  • On day 3 - 6 tsp. (30 g)
  • Day 4 - 50 g
  • Day 5 - 100 g
  • On the 7th day - 150 g

Important!

If on the 5-7th day of the introduction of a new product, the baby still cannot eat 100-150 ml of porridge or puree at once, then this amount can be divided into 2 doses, for example, give 100 ml of porridge in the morning and 50 ml in the evening.

From the second week of the introduction of a new product, one milk feeding can be completely replaced with complementary foods.

Approximate weekly feeding schedule

If we start complementary foods with vegetable puree, then the schedule might look something like this:

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Lunch (14:00): broccoli 10-150 grams. Supplementing with breast milk or infant formula
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml

2 weeks

From the second week, you need to start introducing dairy-free porridge.

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): porridge 10-150 g, supplemented with breast milk or infant formula
  • Lunch (14:00): Broccoli 150 grams. Vegetable oil 5 g Supplementary feeding with breast milk or infant formula up to 50 ml
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula

3 week

From the third week, you need to start introducing meat puree, which is most convenient to add to vegetable puree

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): porridge 150 g, supplemented with breast milk or infant formula
  • Lunch (14:00): Broccoli 150 grams. Vegetable oil 5 g Meat puree 5-20 g Supplementation with breast milk or infant formula up to 50 ml
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula

4 week

From the fourth week, you can introduce fruit puree, which is most convenient to add to porridge

  • Morning feeding (6:00 am): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Breakfast (10:00): porridge 150 g, fruit puree up to 50 g
  • Lunch (14:00): Broccoli 150 grams. Vegetable oil 5 g Meat puree 20 g Supplementation with breast milk or infant formula
  • Afternoon snack (18:00): breast milk or infant formula 180-200 ml
  • Night feeding (22:00): breast milk or infant formula

From the fifth week, you can begin to introduce the second type of porridge, which is most convenient to start adding to the first type, gradually displacing its amount.


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