What food can i give to my 10 month baby


The Best Foods for Babies 10 to 12 Months – Happiest Baby

The 10- to 12-month age range is a time of incredible growth for babies. You'll look down one day, and suddenly your sweet baby might begin to look more like a toddler. And with all the changes happening from trying to walk and talk to showing a natural, vibrant curiosity for the world around them, you'll also notice that their food preferences will mature a bit too. 

The beauty of finger foods for babies between 10 and 12 months is that not only will your baby enjoy nutritious foods, but they will also be getting a dexterity workout too. Using their fingers and hands to pick up and feed themselves is an excellent way to practice hand-to-eye coordination and work on that vital pincher and grasping reflex. 

If you're interested in moving away from purees and venturing into finger foods, then check out this list of snacks and meals that are perfect for your budding toddler. The best part? Most of these can be made ahead to cut down on time in the kitchen.   

Breakfast Foods for Babies

They say that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but it's also a pretty big contender for the most fun. Here are five great, nutrient-packed, finger-friendly breakfasts that your little one will love. 

Overnight Oats

Fill a small jar with one part dry oats, one part breastmilk or formula, and sprinkle in some cut-up fruit, like blueberries or raspberries and a touch of pure maple syrup. Mix it up and leave it in the fridge overnight. This one is great for your baby to practice scooping with their fingers, although it is messy. 

Whole Wheat Waffles

You can buy frozen waffles or make your own and freeze them ahead of time. Make sure to look for whole wheat, and pair your waffles with fresh fruit instead of sugary syrups. Try a dollop of whipped cream (or even better: yogurt) for some added fun, and always make sure to cut up fruit to manageable sizes. 

Hard-Boiled Eggs and Toast Soldiers

Toast soldiers are a fun way to let your baby play with food. Simply toast a piece of bread and cut it into strips for dipping into the egg. Toast soldiers are great for gripping and self-feeding, especially for teething babies. Make sure that your child can handle eating toast before trying this one out. 

Cheese and Veggie Frittata

Frittatas are a lovely way to combine eggs and vegetables for your little one. Not only are they super healthy and delicious, but they’re also easy to pick up and eat. Experiment with fillings such as kale, spinach, pasteurized feta or Swiss, cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, and chives. Always be sure to chop vegetables up into manageable sizes for your baby.  

Morning Smoothie

Smoothies are a fun way to get in vitamins and protein, and there are endless ways to make them. Here are a few popular combinations that your baby might like:

  • Banana, peanut butter, and breastmilk or formula

  • Strawberries, banana, mango, full-fat yogurt, and breastmilk or formula

  • Avocado, spinach, banana, and full-fat yogurt

  • Blueberry, banana, full-fat yogurt, and breastmilk or formula

Lunch Foods for Babies

If your baby is bored with bland, mashed foods for lunch, then try a few of these fun, well-balanced lunch ideas that you can easily make ahead.  

Broccoli and Cauliflower Coins

Steam and mash broccoli and cauliflower, add an egg, some almond flour, and shredded cheddar cheese. Mix ingredients together and use a one-inch melon-baller to drop balls onto a cookie sheet, flatten with a wet fork, and bake at 350 until golden brown. These veggie coins are soft, full of nutrients, and fun to dip into ketchup or applesauce. 

Beef and Barley

Make a batch of beef and barley stew and toss in peas, carrots, and other veggies. Try chopping the finished stew into a chunkier version of puree before serving with toast soldiers. Your baby can scoop with their fingers or practice using a spoon. 

Baby Charcuterie Plate

Using your baby's favorite plate (or a muffin tin!), place bite-sized cubed cheese, crackers, cut-up fruit and veggies, and pieces of cereal for a fun way to eat a balanced meal.

Macaroni and Cheese

Upgrade the old kid food stand-by with chopped veggies like peas, carrots, sweet potato, and corn kernels.

Cottage Cheese and Dippers

Serve cottage cheese in a bowl with a small plate of dippers like toast soldiers, crackers, cut-up pieces of fruit, and soft vegetables like baked sweet potato sticks. 

Dinner Foods for Babies

By 10 to 12 months, you might already be serving your baby the same food that your family eats, albeit chopped, mashed, or cut up. Serving your baby the same foods you eat is ideal because it helps your baby develop a taste for healthy foods. If you're looking for dinner ideas that your baby might love, check out these five options. 

Pasta Bowls

Pasta bowls are perfect because you can add almost anything to your pasta and call it a meal. Look for small pasta shapes like alphabet letters or elbows that your baby can pick up. Here are a few additions to try:

  • Chopped, steamed spinach and ricotta

  • Red sauce with chopped spinach

  • Cooked carrots, peas, and corn kernels garnish with Parmesan cheese

  • Chopped chicken, veggies, and shredded cheese

Rice Bowls

Like pasta bowls, rice bowls are also a great way to add various healthy tidbits for your baby. Simply choose a protein, a vegetable, or two, and offer some flavor options like low-sodium soy sauce or even unsweetened apple sauce. 

Beef and Lentil Stew

Good old-fashioned beef and lentil soup with lots of vegetables is a perfectly balanced meal that you can make ahead and freeze in small amounts. Your baby can use their fingers to pick up pieces of food or practice using a spoon. 

Mash

Mash some sweet potato or potato and mix in some small pieces of cooked veggies for a fun, healthy dinner. Try adding carrots, peas, spinach, kale, corn kernels, cherry tomatoes, beets, and more. 

Fish and Chips

Fish is a wonderfully healthy option for your baby, and it is so easy to eat with those sweet little fingers. Try roasting white fish with a splash of lemon and steamed veggies like asparagus or broccoli. Remember, small and soft, bite-sized pieces are your baby's friend. 

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Disclaimer: The information on our site is NOT medical advice for any specific person or condition. It is only meant as general information. If you have any medical questions and concerns about your child or yourself, please contact your health provider.

Best Early Finger Foods for Baby (With Tips, Visuals, and Recipes)

Use this list of safe, nutritious, and easy to eat finger foods for baby to help you know exactly what (and how) to offer at meals and snacks. Plus, find the best first finger foods, troubleshooting tips, and visuals of foods broken down by food group to keep things easy!

Finger Foods for Baby

After baby starts solids and is ready to move onto finger foods, you may feel a little confused by exactly what to serve and how to serve it. Which is totally normal because it can be scary to let baby feed themselves this way and we may not have any experience doing this—or we may have totally forgotten from our last kiddo!

This list of finger foods for baby will cover some great first finger foods to start with, then set you up with plenty of healthy options from each food group.

TIP: Find more info on starting solids here and the best foods to start with if doing baby led weaning or purees with baby.

Healthy Baby Food

I love sharing these ideas for baby food since they are easy to prepare and serve and because I know how hard it can be to continue to come up with flavorful and healthy meals and snacks for our little ones. Let me tell you, I’m on my third kiddo and it can be such a challenge to feed him during the chaos of parenting the rest of my crew! These foods are wholesome and nutritious—perfect for your baby.

TIP: I’m a big fan of SpoonfulONE, a company that offers the most complete way to introduce food allergens to our kids. They make mix-ins, puffs, and crackers that are yummy and easy for babies and toddlers to eat. Learn more about their pediatrician-approved baby foods here. (sponsored link)

Best First Finger Foods

When baby is around 9 months, you’ll notice that they’re able to pick up smaller pieces of food with two fingers. This is known as the “pincer grasp” and is a sign that they’re ready to start finger foods. To be clear, when I say “finger foods” I mean small pieces of food that a baby (or toddler) can feed themselves.

Here are some of my favorite ones to start with that are all super soft, safe to eat, and easy to pick up.

  • Scrambled egg, broken up into small pieces
  • Roasted sweet potato mashed and broken up into small pieces
  • Fresh raspberries, broken up into smaller pieces
  • Oatmeal, cooked according to package directions and allowed to cool
  • Tofu, diced and sauteed lightly or steamed
  • Ground beef, chicken, or turkey, broken up into small pieces or lightly mashed meatballs
  • Shredded cheese or crumbled goat cheese
  • Mashed sweet potato, in little pieces
  • Peanut butter puffs

TIP: You can serve the tofu, ground meat, or meatballs in veggie puree from a pouch or a simple marinara sauce for extra moisture and flavor. Learn more about how and why to introduce peanut butter.

Finger Foods for Baby: Fruits and Veggies

Some of my favorite early fruits and veggies to serve babies are:

  • Mashed roasted sweet potato, broken up into small pieces
  • Warmed frozen peas, slightly mashed if desired
  • Roasted Zucchini
  • Diced Roasted Sweet Potato or Butternut Squash
  • Fresh blueberries, cut in half or quarters
  • Fresh raspberries, broken into small pieces
  • Banana, broken into small segments (they are less slippery this way versus slicing them)
  • Avocado, diced and mashed slightly (be sure it’s ripe and very soft)

TIP: A good rule of thumb is to serve pieces of food that are about the size of a pea to start and soft enough that they are easy to squish between your fingers. This will be easy for baby to pick up and eat and will also reduce chances of choking.

Finger Food Ideas: Carbohydrates

Offering complex carbohydrates can provide fiber, a variety of textures, B vitamins, and more. Try these with your baby.

  • Spinach pancakes (moisten with applesauce or plain yogurt if needed; this recipe is particularly moist and great for babies)
  • Oatmeal, cooked according to package directions and allowed to cool
  • Baby Puffs
  • Peanut Butter Puffs
  • Rice (it’s easiest if it’s in little clumps so baby can pick it up; this Coconut Rice or this Cheesy Rice are both good options)
  • Baby Banana Muffin
  • O cereal (soften in nondairy unsweetened milk or yogurt as needed)
  • Baked Oatmeal, diced

Finger Food Ideas: Proteins

Offering proteins will continue to expose baby to a range of nutrients. These are my go-tos for babies newer to finger foods—and toddlers too.

  • Shredded cheese (thicker cuts are a little easier to pick up)
  • Tofu, diced and sauteed lightly or steamed
  • Flaked cooked wild salmon
  • Lightly mashed meatballs
  • Shredded chicken, cut up finely (we love this Butter Chicken to share with baby)
  • Ground beef, turkey, or chicken, broken into smaller pieces
  • Lightly mashed beans
  • Scrambled eggs, broken up into small pieces
  • Diced egg muffins

I’d love to hear any questions you may have, or if you have foods that your babies enjoy that I didn’t include here.

Chime in below in the comments!

Prep Time 5 minutes

Cook Time 5 minutes

Total Time 10 minutes

Author Amy Palanjian

Cuisine American

Course Baby Food

Calories 124kcal

Servings 1

First Finger Foods (choose 1-3 per meal)
  • ▢ 1 Scrambled egg (broken up into small pieces)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Roasted sweet potato, mashed and broken up into small pieces
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Fresh raspberries (broken up into smaller pieces)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Oatmeal (cooked according to package directions and allowed to cool)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp Tofu (diced and sauteed lightly or steamed)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp ground beef, chicken, or turkey, broken up into small pieces or lightly mashed meatballs
  • ▢ 2 tbsp shredded cheese or crumbled goat cheese
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Mashed sweet potato (broken into little pieces)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Peanut butter puffs
Fruits and Veggies
  • ▢ 1/4 cup mashed roasted sweet potato (broken up into small pieces)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup warmed frozen peas
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Roasted Zucchini
  • ▢ 1/4 cup diced Roasted Sweet Potato or Butternut Squash
  • ▢ 1/4 cup blueberries (cut in half or quarters)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup raspberries (broken into small pieces)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup banana slices (broken into small segments—they are less slippery this way versus slicing them)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp avocado (diced and mashed slightly—be sure it's ripe and very soft)
Whole Grains and Carbohydrates
  • ▢ 1 Spinach pancakes (moisten with applesauce or plain yogurt if needed; this recipe is particularly moist and great for babies)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Oatmeal (cooked according to package directions and allowed to cool)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Baby Puffs
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Peanut Butter Puffs
  • ▢ 1/4 cup fully cooked rice (it's easiest if it's in little clumps so baby can pick it up; this Coconut Rice or this Cheesy Rice are both good options)
  • ▢ 1 Baby Banana Muffin
  • ▢ 1/4 cup O cereal (soften in nondairy unsweetened milk or yogurt as needed)
  • ▢ 1/4 cup Baked Oatmeal (diced or regular oatmeal broken into little pieces)
Dairy
  • ▢ 2 tbsp Shredded cheese (such as mozzarella)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp Tofu (diced and sauteed lightly or steamed)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp flaked cooked wild salmon
  • ▢ 1 lightly mashed meatballs
  • ▢ 2 tbsp finely shredded chicken (we love this Butter Chicken to share with baby)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp ground beef, turkey, or chicken (broken into smaller pieces)
  • ▢ 2 tbsp lightly mashed beans
  • ▢ 1 Scrambled egg (broken up into small pieces)
  • ▢ 1 Diced Egg muffins
  • For each meal or snack, choose 2-3 foods from a mix of food groups. Aim to include some fat in most meals and protein in many too.

  • Prepare the food, cutting into small pieces and/or mashing as needed to make the food easy to eat.

  • Start with small portions and allow more as baby indicates according to their hunger.

  • Store leftovers in an airtight container for 3-5 days in the fridge.
  • Many foods you cook for your family will work as baby finger foods—just be sure they are easy to squish between your fingers and the pieces are small and easy to chew.
  • Babies very normally make a lot of faces when they eat, so don't assume they don't like something just because they scrunch their nose!
  • Flavors and textures can take time to learn to eat, so continue offering foods in small portions even if baby hasn't liked them in the past—and make sure they taste good to you!

Calories: 124kcal, Carbohydrates: 14g, Protein: 7g, Fat: 4g, Saturated Fat: 1g, Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2g, Trans Fat: 1g, Cholesterol: 164mg, Sodium: 81mg, Potassium: 344mg, Fiber: 4g, Sugar: 5g, Vitamin A: 9857IU, Vitamin C: 18mg, Calcium: 51mg, Iron: 1mg

Tried this recipe?Rate in the comments and tag @yummytoddlerfood on IG!

 

what can a baby eat, what to feed, what vegetables, cereals, fruits to give, regimen and diet for 10 months

Published: 06/20/2020

Reading time: 4 min.

Number of reads: 226392

The author of the article: Ponomareva Yulia Vladimirovna

Pediatrician, candidate of medical sciences, allergist-immunologist

The first year of a baby's life is unique. The processes of growth and development are so intense that each new month is not like the previous one. In this regard, the child's diet undergoes changes every month to meet the growing needs of the body for nutrients, vitamins, minerals and other biologically active substances. Let's discuss what changes are taking place in the baby's diet, and what can be included in the diet at 10 months.

Content: Hide

  1. The basic principles and changes in the diet at 10 months
  2. Organization of the baby's diet at 10 months
  3. First meal
  4. Drink
  5. Lunch
  6. Dinner

Basic principles and changes in nutrition at 10 months

The basic food groups that must be included in the daily diet of children in the second half of life remain the same - vegetables, fruits, meat, cereals, dairy products. There are 3 main meals and 2-3 additional ones, while the portion size increases, and the daily amount of food is 1000-1100 ml. The child no longer looks like a baby - he has grown stronger, is trying to walk, he has an interest in all the phenomena of the world around him, including traditional adult food. Of course, the menu at 10 months is still very different from the food of the general table, but in terms of the possible variety of food, the list is already close to the diet of older children. The baby’s menu can already be diversified with homemade dishes in the form of soups, puddings and casseroles. Vegetables and fruits can be partially raw, grated on a fine grater. The drinking diet is still represented mainly by water, but the child can already drink compotes and fruit drinks of home and industrial production without the addition of sugar and artificial colors.

Feeding a 10-month-old baby

Daily routine and nutrition are very important in a baby's life. Children quickly get used to a certain routine and more readily eat the dishes that are traditionally offered at this meal. Of course, each child is unique, and yours has its own favorite foods and their combinations. Try to rationally distribute all the necessary complementary foods in 5 meals, taking into account the characteristics of family life. Adhere to the principle of a balanced menu, plan your diet for the week in advance, while trying to diversify your diet as much as possible, accustoming your child to the taste of new foods.

First meal

The first meal is early in the morning - the baby wakes up hungry after a 6-8 hour break in food. It is best to feed your baby with breast milk or an adapted formula. Child health and nutrition experts recommend continued breastfeeding (BC) until at least the end of the first year of life. The nutritional value of mother's milk at this age is already low, but as a source of the most important biological substances and psycho-emotional comfort, it is undoubtedly priceless. If the child is bottle-fed, you can prepare him a drink based on an adapted mixture. Until the end of the first year of a child's life, it is not recommended to feed whole cow's milk. The fact is that the protein of cow's and goat's milk can cause an allergic reaction, in addition, it causes damage to the intestinal epithelium of an infant and is a serious burden on the kidneys. Do not rush to introduce this unadapted product into the baby's diet.

See also: Complementary Foods and Meals

Breakfast

The second meal, at approximately 9-10 am, should provide energy and nutrients for a 10-month-old baby to be active in the morning. What can you offer your child for breakfast? Milk porridge is the perfect product for a good start to the day - it is rich in complex carbohydrates, which ensures long-term saturation and energy boost. The dietary fibers included in its composition are involved in comfortable digestion. In addition, cereals are a source of almost all essential nutrients. In the nutrition of babies at 10 months, the consistency of porridge may already be less homogeneous. Try introducing porridge into your diet, which contains cereal flakes and crushed berries, which helps your child learn to chew. At this age, mothers often begin to cook porridge at home, but it is preferable to use industrial products. Commercially produced porridge is often multi-cereal, which makes it possible to use the beneficial qualities of various grain crops, including those that cannot be cooked at home due to poor digestibility. Cereals go well with fruits and vegetables. For breakfast, you can additionally offer fruit puree or slices of boiled / baked soft fruits for breakfast. Cottage cheese and vegetable or cottage cheese and cereal casseroles and puddings can diversify the weekly breakfast menu. Every day a child can eat up to 50 grams of cottage cheese. If the child has not previously had allergic reactions, you can expand the range of fruits and gradually introduce citrus fruits and a number of exotic fruits into the diet.

Drinks

It is not recommended to give a large amount of liquid immediately after a meal, as this overloads the digestion process. Limit yourself to a few sips of water or compote if the child wants to drink food. And between the main meals, periodically offer the baby water, compote or fruit drink, as well as special children's tea. Limit your juice intake, as this is a high-carbohydrate product and is a serious burden on the organs of the gastrointestinal tract. The volume of juice per day should not exceed 100 ml.

Lunch

The next meal, lunch, covers a third of the total energy expenditure of the day and provides essential nutrients for active growth and development. At 10 months, it is already possible to offer the baby unpurified soup, provided that well-boiled vegetables are used. Meat complementary foods should be combined with foods that promote the best absorption of trace elements important for growth and development, especially copper and iron. First of all, these are vegetables, with the exception of legumes, and buckwheat. Given that different types of meat contain different amounts of trace elements and vitamins, a balanced weekly diet includes at least 3-4 types of meat complementary foods. Also, 1-2 times a week, the baby can eat dishes with the addition of offal - the liver, tongue and heart. In addition to mashed meat, the baby can be offered coarsely chopped meatballs or steam cutlets. Adding vegetable and cereal components to a meat dish makes the taste more tender and enriches the diet with other beneficial nutrients. Despite the insipid taste of dinner dishes, which seems to many adults, it is not recommended to add salt and spices to them. At 10 months, onions and parsley and dill can be used to develop taste buds in dishes.

Snack

Snack, although not the main meal, is necessary for the baby to reinforce forces after a daytime nap and provide the necessary energy for active activities in the afternoon. A dairy product rich in easily digestible protein and fat is ideal, combined with cereals and fruits that complement the dish with carbohydrates and fiber. For a 10-month-old baby, this could be a specialized fermented milk drink combined with baby biscuits and fruit. Another option would be a special industrial product called "Snack Porridge", which is a delicious dessert that combines cereals, milk and natural fruits. In addition to nutritional value, it is a source of dietary fiber, organic acids, vitamins and trace elements. And for kids, this is a delicacy, because the dish has a delicate texture and pleasant taste.

Dinner

The main evening meal should be easy to digest to avoid problems with digestion at night, and at the same time be nutritious. A 10-month-old baby can be offered a fish soufflé with a vegetable garnish, a curd-cereal casserole with fruit sauce, baked vegetables with noodles, or a fruit-cereal pudding. Right before bedtime, the baby can be fed with breast milk or an adapted mixture, which will ensure comfortable falling asleep and a restful night's sleep.

The table shows a sample menu for one day for a healthy 10 month old baby.

EASURE MORNTY MORNTY MORNET MOTHOUTIONA

Seeing

Menus

volume, ml / number, grams

200

Water/compote or juice

100/100

Lunch (13:00)

Vegetable soup with 70003 9,0002 60/2

Fresh carrot salad with olive oil

50/3

200

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Diet for a child aged 9-12 months

By 9 months the main complementary foods have already been introduced, so the expansion of the child's diet continues. It is important to know that at this age the consistency of the products should change from homogenized to finely and coarsely ground.
A meat dish for an older child can be offered in the form of meatballs, which diversifies the child's diet and stimulates the formation of chewing skills. Canned meat industrial production for children over 8 months. - coarsely chopped, spices and spices (white pepper, celery, parsley, dill, onion, basil, thyme) can be added to them.

The volume of fish puree increases to 60 g per day by 12 months. Fish is given 2 times a week boiled without broth (instead of meat).

At this age, children's pasta can be offered to the child.

The number of children's biscuits and crackers is increased up to 10-15 g per day (2-3 biscuits).

By the year it is useful to add finely chopped fresh garden greens (dill, parsley) to various dishes, which significantly enriches the diet with vitamins and minerals.

Sample diet for a 12 month old child:

breakfast
8 hours
Dairy-free or milk porridge*
Butter
Boiled egg yolk
Fruit puree
150-200 g
approx. 1 tsp.
1/2 pcs
50 g
lunch
12 noon
Vegetable puree
Vegetable oil
Meat puree (meatballs) or fish
Bread/rust
Compote

180 g
about 1/2 tsp.
50 g
10 g
50 ml

afternoon tea
4 pm
Breast milk (kefir or yogurt)**
Cottage cheese
Fruit puree
Baby biscuits
100 g
50 g
50-70 g
2 pcs
dinner
20 hours
Vegetables or porridge**
Meat puree
Vegetable oil
Fruit juice
180 g
20 g
1/2 tsp.
50 ml
at bedtime
11 pm
Breast milk (DMS)*** 200 ml

* - dairy-free porridge should be diluted with breast milk or infant formula that the child receives. Milk porridge is diluted with water.
** - daily volume of kefir or yogurt can be up to 200 ml,
*** - infant milk formula

Approximate diet of a 12-month-old child with an allergy to cow's milk proteins:

breakfast

8 hours

Dairy-free porridge*
Vegetable oil
Fruit puree
150-200 g
approx. 1 tsp.
50 g
lunch
12 noon
Vegetable puree
Vegetable oil
Meat puree/meatball
Bread/rust
Compote
180 g
about 1/2 tsp.
50-70 g
10 g
50 ml
afternoon tea
4 pm
Breast milk or formula for infants with cow's milk protein intolerance
Fruit puree
Rusk

150-180 ml
50 g
10 g

dinner
20 hours
Vegetables or dairy-free porridge**
Vegetable oil
Meat puree
Fruit juice
180 g
about 1/2 tsp.
30-40 g
50 ml
at bedtime
11 pm
Breast milk or formula for infants with intolerance to cow's milk proteins 200 ml

* - dairy-free porridge should be diluted with breast milk or formula for children with intolerance to cow's milk proteins.
** - you can either alternate porridge or vegetables, or offer a mixed dish - porridge with vegetables.


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